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Discuss Walmart battery pro-rating policy in the alt.auto.mercedes forum at Car Dealer Forums; For years I have boycotted Walm-mart because of their slave-shop labor practices and other sissues ...
  1. #1
    weelliott@gmail.com
    Guest

    Default Walmart battery pro-rating policy

    For years I have boycotted Walm-mart because of their slave-shop labor
    practices and other sissues that I won't get into. However, my car
    came with a wal-mart battery, and when it ran out under warranty, I
    got another one from them for free. I used to always get them from
    Sears since they used to be everywhere, and have real automotive
    departments, but about three years ago I decided that I'd go with Wal-
    mart for their batteries since they are everywhere, and when you have
    a bad battery, that is a good thing.

    However, I might change that policy of mine for the following reason.
    I bought a 2 year free replacement battery from them about 2.5 years
    ago. It says right on it that after the free-=replacement period that
    battery is pro-rated over a 72 month time period. My battery died last
    week, and when I went to replace it, they only gave me nine dollars
    back on a 67 dollar battery. My math indicates that I should have
    gotten almost 28 bucks credit to the new one. So when I bought the
    battery, they charged me a nine buck core charge. I asked the cashier
    how to get my pro-rate back. She told me to take my old battery to
    customer service to get my "pro-rate" back. However, once there, they
    told me that it is their policy to give everyone with a battery out of
    warranty but in the pro-rate period nine bucks flat rate. I then
    looked at my reciept and noticed the nine dollar core charge. I
    pointed out to them that a core charge and a pro-rate are not the same
    thing. They insist that the core charge that they refund to a person
    bringing in a battery is a pro-rate.

    That is not a pro-rate though. That is just a core charge. In fact
    they even call it a core charge, and charge it to you on the reciept
    when you buy the new one. So in effect, they didn't give me a pro-rate
    at all. This is their policy though.

    So in short they are not delivering on their promise of pro-rating
    their batteries. Not that I am one to go sue over crap like this, but
    I'm surprised that some high-strung lawyer hasn't pounced on this and
    created a class-action lawsuit. It's cut and dry theft in my eyes.

    Am I out in left field here? I have had multiple pro-rated things fail
    and wound up getting my fraction of their advertised value applied to
    the replacement.

    Thoughts?

    Bill

  2. #2
    Tiger
    Guest

    Default Re: Walmart battery pro-rating policy

    I am using Autozone batteries. They are good and they are good on their
    warranty.

    File a complaint with your state consumer protection agency. Give them
    copies of everything... warranty, all reciepts, and write on it to explain
    them what happened. Calculate your own Prorate using the warranty that you
    recieved... So if you are owed $28... do it in calculation so that the
    warranty support it... plus that $9 core charge they charged you.

    Send a copy of your complaint to Walmart headquarter and you will get your
    money back. If all this does not work, then threaten Walmart in another
    letter along with a copy of letter you sent to them... that you will sue
    them in small claim court.

    With small claim court, Walmart must send a corporate lawyer... which means
    $250+ an hour lawyer fee... this case will easily cost them $1000 to settle
    in court. Explain this to them in letter too. So you are giving them a
    chance to make good with you before you file a claim.

    If you do file a claim, go to court on appointed day. If no representative
    is there to defend Walmart, judge will rule in your favor and place a lien
    on Walmart... which is basically you own part of Walmart for a kicker.



  3. #3
    -->> T.G. Lambach
    Guest

    Default Re: Walmart battery pro-rating policy

    Seventy two months is about the longest warranty offered on most
    batteries. A 72 month battery probably has the following warranty:

    72 month prorated warranty during which the first 24 months are a free
    replacement - not prorated. However, the proration starts on day one so
    the customer paid portion of the proration on the 24th month is 24/72
    and theirs is 48/72. After 36 months it's 50%, after 48 months you pay
    67% etc. That's how a proration ought to work. Read the new battery's
    warranty to see if that's the case.

    Sometimes a retailer will use the full list price of a tire, battery
    etc. to calculate your share of the proration, even thought the item was
    purchased and usually sells for a substantial discount. A 50% driver
    share of a $120 (full retail) item is $60 vs. its usual, say, $75
    discounted price. That's how a retailer reduces its warranty costs.

    I don't understand the "core charge" which is another matter; I thought
    a battery has a nominal ($2) credit for its metal. Our recycling center
    takes them for free.

    I suggest you phone your local consumer protection bureau, part of local
    government.
    --

    2008 T.G.Lambach. Publication in any form requires prior written
    permission.

  4. #4
    weelliott@gmail.com
    Guest

    Default Re: Walmart battery pro-rating policy

    That is exactly how I thought they worked, and how I calculated the 28
    dollar value. But now I see that actually I had messed up in my
    message. I had actually used up about 28 or 29 dollars worth of value,
    but still had about 38 dollars of value left. I should have been
    credited 38 bucks, not 28 bucks. It was a 24 month free replacement 72
    month pro-rate. I had had it for 31 months. So I had 41 months left.
    When 41 is divided by 72 then multiplied by the $66.88 you get $38.08.

    Unfortunately I don't have a reciept to prove my case in court. The
    only proof of the age of the battery was the shipping date sticker on
    the side of the battery. They provide a handy pocket to stick the
    receipt in, but since the reciept was exposed to the elements in my
    engine bay, it had turned dark purple and was a crumbled mess. I think
    it was thermal paper, and apparently my engine bay gets hot enough to
    effect it.

    I just thought that others should know about Wal-marts practices. It
    could be one isolated store that I went to, but they swore up and down
    that that is the policy everywhere.

    Oh well. Thank you for validating that what I was pretty sure was true
    about pro-rates still held true.

    Have a good day,
    Bill


    > 72 month prorated warranty during which the first 24 months are a free
    > replacement - not prorated. However, the proration starts on day one so
    > the customer paid portion of the proration on the 24th month is 24/72
    > and theirs is 48/72. After 36 months it's 50%, after 48 months you pay
    > 67% etc. That's how a proration ought to work. Read the new battery's
    > warranty to see if that's the case.


  5. #5
    Tiger
    Guest

    Default Re: Walmart battery pro-rating policy

    I am sorry to hear that. Thermal paper must be photocopied in order to
    preserve the proof. Thermal paper will always fade over time.

    So with any extended warranty purchase, always photocopy them. It doesn't
    matter where you keep them... cool and dry or hot and high humidity, they
    will fade... In sun? Ha! Even faster. I think this is a loophole for all of
    them.

    As far as Autozone, they have all your information on computer. No need to
    bring reciept (it is good to bring one though)... they have you on the
    computer.




  6. #6
    heav
    Guest

    Default Re: Walmart battery pro-rating policy

    This sounds like you ran into a nitwit at the counter. Did you try
    again with a different manager, maybe one with more intelligence?

    I have had terrible luck with Costco tire departments, but I have a
    Costco 95 month warranty battery in my Toyota Corolla I have had since
    1993 and it still works fine. They don't offer a battery that fits my
    300 TDT though, I have to use a Sears International in that.

  7. #7
    weelliott@gmail.com
    Guest

    Default Re: Walmart battery pro-rating policy

    On Mar 26, 11:12*am, heav <p...@inyopro.com> wrote:
    > This sounds like you ran into a nitwit at the counter. *Did you try
    > again with a different manager, maybe one with more intelligence?
    >
    > I have had terrible luck with Costco tire departments, but I have a
    > Costco 95 month warranty battery in my Toyota Corolla I have had since
    > 1993 and it still works fine. *They don't offer a battery that fits my
    > 300 TDT though, I have to use a Sears International in that.


    It may have been that I was dealing with a nit-wit. Although, the nit-
    wit's manager sang the same story, and before I bought the battery I
    asked a guy in the automotive department (just some guy stocking
    shelves) where I go to get my pro-rate, and he said that as far as he
    knew they don't do pro-rates. I showed him my battery, with the pro-
    rate statement printed right on it, and all he said was that,"it must
    be an old one." However, the new one has the same thing printed on it.
    So I think that he was the most clueless. Strangely enough, the lady
    that I was dealing directly with seemed rather intelligent. Maybe she
    was funding her way through college at Wal-mart.

    I think I'll have to start getting my batteries from autozone. They
    are nearly ubiquitous. I did get an alternator from them a few years
    back that went bad within the warranty period, and they replaced it
    with no hassle without needing anything more than my phone number.

  8. #8
    raymond
    Guest

    Default Re: Walmart battery pro-rating policy

    waitasec.........

    you boycotted Walmart due to their slave-shop labor, et al ....but
    sold out for ease of availability of their car battery, and the
    likelihood
    of a free replacement?

  9. #9
    weelliott@gmail.com
    Guest

    Default Re: Walmart battery pro-rating policy

    On Mar 28, 2:20*am, raymond <avi8to...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > waitasec.........
    >
    > you boycotted Walmart due to their slave-shop labor, et al ....but
    > sold out for ease of availability of their car battery, and the
    > likelihood
    > of a free replacement?


    Okay, you got me. It was a questionable decision. But three years ago
    when I first went to them for a battery, it was because I already had
    one of theirs that came with a car that I bought. Their battery had
    gone bad, so I went to them for a replacement. I couldn't justify
    paying full price somewhere else when I still had pro-rated value left
    in that battery.

    Since then I have put a battery in one other car of mine that I bought
    with a dead battery. I went to Sears first, but they had shut down
    their automotive department. I remembered that Wal-mart had batteries,
    and they had the one thing that I had always liked about Sears-the
    fact that they were everywhere. Since the guy at sears was saying that
    they were phasing out their automotive stuff, I thought it would be
    foolish to look for another Sears that still had an automotive
    department since eventually that would go away leaving me with a
    battery without support. At this point I should have just switched to
    Autozone or some place like that. But it never occured to me. I didn't
    know that they sold batteries.

    And I wasn't going with Wal-mart because they offer free replacements.
    Pretty much all brands offer a warranty period where they will replace
    it for free within the first two or three years. If you re-read me
    post, I was not looking for a free battery, but to get credit for the
    pro-rated value in my battery, which is the industry practice.

    So now I am done with them. You might be happy to know that you are
    the straw that broke the camel's back. Even when this battery dies,
    I'm just going to get one elsewhere. That is unless it dies within the
    free replacement period. Then it is more of a burden to Wal-mart.
    Apparently you can still get Diehard batteries elsewhere now. I wish
    Target sold batteries. They're everywhere, and a responsible company.

  10. #10
    RF
    Guest

    Default Re: Walmart battery pro-rating policy

    weelliott@gmail.com wrote:
    > On Mar 28, 2:20 am, raymond <avi8to...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >> waitasec.........
    >>
    >> you boycotted Walmart due to their slave-shop labor, et al ....but
    >> sold out for ease of availability of their car battery, and the
    >> likelihood
    >> of a free replacement?

    >
    > Okay, you got me. It was a questionable decision. But three years ago
    > when I first went to them for a battery, it was because I already had
    > one of theirs that came with a car that I bought. Their battery had
    > gone bad, so I went to them for a replacement. I couldn't justify
    > paying full price somewhere else when I still had pro-rated value left
    > in that battery.
    >
    > Since then I have put a battery in one other car of mine that I bought
    > with a dead battery. I went to Sears first, but they had shut down
    > their automotive department. I remembered that Wal-mart had batteries,
    > and they had the one thing that I had always liked about Sears-the
    > fact that they were everywhere. Since the guy at sears was saying that
    > they were phasing out their automotive stuff, I thought it would be
    > foolish to look for another Sears that still had an automotive
    > department since eventually that would go away leaving me with a
    > battery without support. At this point I should have just switched to
    > Autozone or some place like that. But it never occured to me. I didn't
    > know that they sold batteries.
    >
    > And I wasn't going with Wal-mart because they offer free replacements.
    > Pretty much all brands offer a warranty period where they will replace
    > it for free within the first two or three years. If you re-read me
    > post, I was not looking for a free battery, but to get credit for the
    > pro-rated value in my battery, which is the industry practice.
    >
    > So now I am done with them. You might be happy to know that you are
    > the straw that broke the camel's back. Even when this battery dies,
    > I'm just going to get one elsewhere. That is unless it dies within the
    > free replacement period. Then it is more of a burden to Wal-mart.
    > Apparently you can still get Diehard batteries elsewhere now. I wish
    > Target sold batteries. They're everywhere, and a responsible company.


    Just 2 comments:

    1 According to Consumer Reports ratings the Diehard
    batteries are rather low.
    You can do much better.

    2 A few years ago I noticed the receipts fading and I am now
    in the habit
    of scanning them into my computer just after buying. Later,
    if I need to, I can
    just print them.

    RF

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