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Discuss Foreign cars pass Big 3 in the alt.autos.gm forum at Car Dealer Forums; http://www.detnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll...plate=printart Foreign cars pass Big 3 For the 1st time, U.S. drivers buy more import ...
  1. #1
    dbltap
    Guest

    Default Foreign cars pass Big 3

    http://www.detnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll...plate=printart

    Foreign cars pass Big 3

    For the 1st time, U.S. drivers buy more import brands

    Josee Valcourt / The Detroit News

    For the first time, U.S. consumers are buying more cars and trucks built by
    foreign automakers than vehicles made by Detroit's traditional Big Three.

    New statistics compiled by R.L. Polk and Co., which counts new car
    registrations and excludes sales to rental car agencies and other fleet
    customers, show foreign brands commanded 52.9 percent of the retail auto
    market in the first five months of 2006, while domestic automakers fell to
    47.1 percent.

    Domestic brands led foreign makes 51 percent to 49 percent over the same
    period last year.

    While the power shift has been long in the making, it's nonetheless a
    disheartening sign that Detroit's auto industry is losing the battle for the
    hearts and wallets of American car buyers.

    Domestic brands such as Chevrolet, Ford and Dodge still control more than
    half the U.S. market when fleet sales are included, but more profitable
    retail sales are considered the best indicator of which auto brands are most
    popular with customers.

    "I'm not surprised," said Christian Wardlaw, senior analyst with
    Autobytel.com, a car shopping Web site. "The proof is sitting there in black
    and white on paper. People can't refute it anymore."

    About 2.55 million new domestic-brand cars and trucks were registered in the
    first five months of this year versus 2.86 million foreign nameplates in the
    same period, Polk reported. The foreign nameplates figure includes some
    brands such as Ford-owned Land Rover and Jaguar that are controlled by the
    Big Three.

    Chrysler Group spokesman Kevin McCormick said the Auburn Hills-based company
    doesn't get caught up in the industry scorekeeping, saying the automaker is
    "focusing on things we can control in our business. Our strategy at a high
    level is to put out the best cars and trucks that we can at prices that are
    attractive to consumers."

    But industry experts say the numbers illustrate that Asian automakers such
    as Toyota Motor Corp., Honda Motor Co and Nissan Motor Co. are doing a
    better job meeting the needs of U.S. car buyers.

    Domestic brands have been hurt by lower quality scores, and more recently, a
    heavy reliance on large trucks and SUVs at a time of a high gas prices.

    "People have been swapping SUVs for fuel-efficient cars, and the domestics'
    car lineup hasn't been as compelling as the Asians'," Wardlaw said.

    Amenities factor in

    Import brands are leveraging strong profits to turn out cars packed with
    safety features, creature comforts and the latest technology, said Phil
    Reed, consumer advice editor of auto research site Edmunds.com.

    "With American cars, you say 'This is nice and this is nice but why couldn't
    they have done this?' " he said.

    The Ford Escape Hybrid, for example, has an optional navigation system, but
    the screen that displays maps and approaching roads is too small, Reed said.
    In addition, a disc has to be inserted to operate the system, but there is
    no additional slot to play music CDs meaning the driver has to choose
    between listening to tunes and navigating streets.

    With the availability of the Internet, buyers have become savvy about how to
    compare the optional versus standard features they can get for their money
    and can more easily calculate a vehicle's resale value.

    Vehicles made by Toyota, Honda and other top foreign makes generally hold
    their value better than American brand cars and trucks, which are often
    heavily discounted.

    "Toyota has a 10- to 15-year outlook on where the industry is heading," said
    James Bryant, automotive industry editor for Hoover's Inc., an online
    business resource site. "GM and Ford tend to play along with whatever
    happens to be the flavor of the week.

    "Everybody knew that $3 gas was going to come eventually," he added. "We
    just didn't want to admit it."

    And foreign automakers have done a better job capturing the emerging
    crossover SUV segment with vehicles like the Nissan Murano and U.S.
    automakers are racing to catch up with offerings like the upcoming Ford
    Edge.

    Toyota registrations rise

    Toyota's U.S. brands posted a 12.5 percent increase in retail sales in the
    first five months of the year. By contrast, GM's retail sales slipped 7.7
    percent. Excluding fleet sales, Toyota brands now outsell Ford and Chrysler
    nameplates in the United States, Polk reported.

    Wardlaw said competing carmakers aren't only leading in important segments
    but getting new products to the market at a faster pace.

    The product life cycle for an Asian nameplate is about four to six years
    compared to six to eight years for a new domestic car or truck.

    Wardlaw points out, for example, that the Ford Focus was merely refreshed
    for the U.S. market while the Focus sold in Europe was completely
    redesigned.

    "What Americans got was a rehashed version of the old Focus and as a result,
    Ford isn't in a position to compete" against popular small vehicles such as
    the Honda Civic in the U.S. market at a time when gas prices are pushing
    consumers to cars.

    In a separate study conducted by Autobytel.com Monday, online purchase
    requests for large trucks such the Ford F-150 pickup fell 34 percent, and 43
    percent for the Toyota Tundra and Chevrolet Silverado for the second
    quarter. In comparison, more fuel-efficient cars like the Toyota Camry and
    Yaris, and the Honda Civic posted gains.

    "The trick for the domestic automakers is going to be that they need to
    spread development dollars across every development segment in which they
    want to compete, and that includes cars and trucks," Wardlaw said.

    You can reach Josee Valcourt at (313) 222-2300 or jmvalcourt@detnews.com.



  2. #2
    Picasso
    Guest

    Default Re: Foreign cars pass Big 3

    Well none of that surprises me.

    Heres one of the problems... Fords Vision...

    "Our goal is to build on our traditional strengths and redefine them for
    the 21st century. We're going to apply fresh thinking and innovative
    technology to everything we do, from our basic business processes to the
    products that define who we are as a company," Ford says. "Our vision
    moving forward is to build great products, a strong business and a
    better world."


    Nothing about the people at all....

    building on traditional strengths... hrm, sounds old fasion. I like it,
    but 200 million other people probally think its boring.

    to build great products, a strong business and a better world...

    Now if that isn';t cheesy

    You may think I dislike ford, but the opposite is true, I just don't
    think they are sufficiently competing with other companies.

    dbltap wrote:
    > http://www.detnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll...plate=printart
    >
    > Foreign cars pass Big 3
    >
    > For the 1st time, U.S. drivers buy more import brands
    >
    > Josee Valcourt / The Detroit News
    >
    > For the first time, U.S. consumers are buying more cars and trucks built by
    > foreign automakers than vehicles made by Detroit's traditional Big Three.
    >
    > New statistics compiled by R.L. Polk and Co., which counts new car
    > registrations and excludes sales to rental car agencies and other fleet
    > customers, show foreign brands commanded 52.9 percent of the retail auto
    > market in the first five months of 2006, while domestic automakers fell to
    > 47.1 percent.
    >
    > Domestic brands led foreign makes 51 percent to 49 percent over the same
    > period last year.
    >
    > While the power shift has been long in the making, it's nonetheless a
    > disheartening sign that Detroit's auto industry is losing the battle for the
    > hearts and wallets of American car buyers.
    >
    > Domestic brands such as Chevrolet, Ford and Dodge still control more than
    > half the U.S. market when fleet sales are included, but more profitable
    > retail sales are considered the best indicator of which auto brands are most
    > popular with customers.
    >
    > "I'm not surprised," said Christian Wardlaw, senior analyst with
    > Autobytel.com, a car shopping Web site. "The proof is sitting there in black
    > and white on paper. People can't refute it anymore."
    >
    > About 2.55 million new domestic-brand cars and trucks were registered in the
    > first five months of this year versus 2.86 million foreign nameplates in the
    > same period, Polk reported. The foreign nameplates figure includes some
    > brands such as Ford-owned Land Rover and Jaguar that are controlled by the
    > Big Three.
    >
    > Chrysler Group spokesman Kevin McCormick said the Auburn Hills-based company
    > doesn't get caught up in the industry scorekeeping, saying the automaker is
    > "focusing on things we can control in our business. Our strategy at a high
    > level is to put out the best cars and trucks that we can at prices that are
    > attractive to consumers."
    >
    > But industry experts say the numbers illustrate that Asian automakers such
    > as Toyota Motor Corp., Honda Motor Co and Nissan Motor Co. are doing a
    > better job meeting the needs of U.S. car buyers.
    >
    > Domestic brands have been hurt by lower quality scores, and more recently, a
    > heavy reliance on large trucks and SUVs at a time of a high gas prices.
    >
    > "People have been swapping SUVs for fuel-efficient cars, and the domestics'
    > car lineup hasn't been as compelling as the Asians'," Wardlaw said.
    >
    > Amenities factor in
    >
    > Import brands are leveraging strong profits to turn out cars packed with
    > safety features, creature comforts and the latest technology, said Phil
    > Reed, consumer advice editor of auto research site Edmunds.com.
    >
    > "With American cars, you say 'This is nice and this is nice but why couldn't
    > they have done this?' " he said.
    >
    > The Ford Escape Hybrid, for example, has an optional navigation system, but
    > the screen that displays maps and approaching roads is too small, Reed said.
    > In addition, a disc has to be inserted to operate the system, but there is
    > no additional slot to play music CDs meaning the driver has to choose
    > between listening to tunes and navigating streets.
    >
    > With the availability of the Internet, buyers have become savvy about how to
    > compare the optional versus standard features they can get for their money
    > and can more easily calculate a vehicle's resale value.
    >
    > Vehicles made by Toyota, Honda and other top foreign makes generally hold
    > their value better than American brand cars and trucks, which are often
    > heavily discounted.
    >
    > "Toyota has a 10- to 15-year outlook on where the industry is heading," said
    > James Bryant, automotive industry editor for Hoover's Inc., an online
    > business resource site. "GM and Ford tend to play along with whatever
    > happens to be the flavor of the week.
    >
    > "Everybody knew that $3 gas was going to come eventually," he added. "We
    > just didn't want to admit it."
    >
    > And foreign automakers have done a better job capturing the emerging
    > crossover SUV segment with vehicles like the Nissan Murano and U.S.
    > automakers are racing to catch up with offerings like the upcoming Ford
    > Edge.
    >
    > Toyota registrations rise
    >
    > Toyota's U.S. brands posted a 12.5 percent increase in retail sales in the
    > first five months of the year. By contrast, GM's retail sales slipped 7.7
    > percent. Excluding fleet sales, Toyota brands now outsell Ford and Chrysler
    > nameplates in the United States, Polk reported.
    >
    > Wardlaw said competing carmakers aren't only leading in important segments
    > but getting new products to the market at a faster pace.
    >
    > The product life cycle for an Asian nameplate is about four to six years
    > compared to six to eight years for a new domestic car or truck.
    >
    > Wardlaw points out, for example, that the Ford Focus was merely refreshed
    > for the U.S. market while the Focus sold in Europe was completely
    > redesigned.
    >
    > "What Americans got was a rehashed version of the old Focus and as a result,
    > Ford isn't in a position to compete" against popular small vehicles such as
    > the Honda Civic in the U.S. market at a time when gas prices are pushing
    > consumers to cars.
    >
    > In a separate study conducted by Autobytel.com Monday, online purchase
    > requests for large trucks such the Ford F-150 pickup fell 34 percent, and 43
    > percent for the Toyota Tundra and Chevrolet Silverado for the second
    > quarter. In comparison, more fuel-efficient cars like the Toyota Camry and
    > Yaris, and the Honda Civic posted gains.
    >
    > "The trick for the domestic automakers is going to be that they need to
    > spread development dollars across every development segment in which they
    > want to compete, and that includes cars and trucks," Wardlaw said.
    >
    > You can reach Josee Valcourt at (313) 222-2300 or jmvalcourt@detnews.com.
    >
    >



  3. #3
    Bassplayer12
    Guest

    Default Re: Foreign cars pass Big 3

    snip

    > While the power shift has been long in the making, it's nonetheless a
    > disheartening sign that Detroit's auto industry is losing the battle for
    > the hearts and wallets of American car buyers.


    Does anybody know how much it costs Toyota and Honda to build a car compared
    to
    the Big 3?
    What are the benefits and salaries paid to the employees?
    If there's a difference, the day may come when the Big 3 are going to demand
    concessions
    from them to save the companies and their jobs.

    snip

    > Chrysler Group spokesman Kevin McCormick said the Auburn Hills-based
    > company doesn't get caught up in the industry scorekeeping, saying the
    > automaker is "focusing on things we can control in our business. Our
    > strategy at a high level is to put out the best cars and trucks that we
    > can at prices that are attractive to consumers."


    Sorry, Chrysler. Count me out as a customer. For good. I've had too many
    problems with my
    minivan's transmission, peeling paint, etc. I'll remember.

    > But industry experts say the numbers illustrate that Asian automakers such
    > as Toyota Motor Corp., Honda Motor Co and Nissan Motor Co. are doing a
    > better job meeting the needs of U.S. car buyers.
    >
    > Domestic brands have been hurt by lower quality scores, and more recently,
    > a heavy reliance on large trucks and SUVs at a time of a high gas prices.


    2 years ago, my 93 Camry with 234,000 kms at the time, felt more solid and
    gave a better ride
    than a brand new rental Alero.

    > "People have been swapping SUVs for fuel-efficient cars, and the
    > domestics' car lineup hasn't been as compelling as the Asians'," Wardlaw
    > said.


    Aren't Impalas fuel efficient cars? Here in Canada, they are rated at around
    40MPG.
    BTW, if you think it's too optimistic, remember that Canadian and US gallons
    are different.

    snip

    > "Everybody knew that $3 gas was going to come eventually," he added. "We
    > just didn't want to admit it."


    In Europe and Asia, they have been building ecenomical cars for the longest
    time. In North
    America, oil was cheap and we didn't care much.

    snip

    > "The trick for the domestic automakers is going to be that they need to
    > spread development dollars across every development segment in which they
    > want to compete, and that includes cars and trucks," Wardlaw said.


    The trick is also to hire less people with accounting and business degrees
    and more "car people".



  4. #4
    Mike Marlow
    Guest

    Default Re: Foreign cars pass Big 3


    "Bassplayer12" <perettij@nbnet.nb.ca> wrote in message
    news:yfIxg.17744$pu3.351347@ursa-nb00s0.nbnet.nb.ca...

    >
    > The trick is also to hire less people with accounting and business degrees
    > and more "car people".
    >
    >


    I disagree. I propose that the trick is to hire finance and business
    managers who are skilled and experienced in business that is customer
    centric. I know it's a buzz word, but it does have a value. There are
    industry segments out there that have been fighting the competitive battle
    on the low margin commodity battle ground for quite a while now and they
    have been the ones who have defined the notion of satisfying the customer -
    on the terms of the customer, not by the terms of the manufacturer. They
    have built successful and profitable businesses. Bring in executives from
    the High Tech sector, for example. They understand the notion of leading
    edge designs that actually bring new value to a product and create a
    competitive position for that product. They understand how to cut
    manufacturing costs without cutting reliability. They understand the
    pitfalls of claiming quality, nifty program names (Quality is job 1) that
    serve nothing but to put out a new slogan, and they understand the nature of
    a rapidly advancing environment. It would be a radical change, but just
    like the phone companies needed radical change after divestiture, the motor
    companies of today need the same. What they don't need is another
    "alliance" as has been suggested for GM.

    --

    -Mike-
    mmarlowREMOVE@alltel.net



  5. #5
    jg
    Guest

    Default Re: Foreign cars pass Big 3


    "dbltap" <DoubleTap@37.com> wrote in message
    news:G0Bxg.3225$gF6.1123@newsread2.news.pas.earthl ink.net...
    > http://www.detnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll...plate=printart
    >
    > Foreign cars pass Big 3
    >

    ..............
    > "The trick for the domestic automakers is going to be that they need to
    > spread development dollars across every development segment in which they
    > want to compete, and that includes cars and trucks," Wardlaw said.
    >

    Even including cars & trucks huh? Observations like that one from an
    "expert" might give some insight into why they are losing ground.



  6. #6
    rantonrave@mail.com
    Guest

    Default Re: Foreign cars pass Big 3


    Bassplayer12 wrote:

    >Does anybody know how much it costs Toyota and Honda to build a car compared
    >to the Big 3?


    Big 3 = GM, Ford, Toyota.

    Toyota and Honda probably average 3-6 hours less in final assembly time
    per car, and Toyota does it with less automation than

    > What are the benefits and salaries paid to the employees?


    Same pay, worse medical and pension than GM, Ford, and
    Damlier-Chrysler.

    >The trick is also to hire less people with accounting and business degrees
    >and more "car people".


    Don't promote people to managerial positions unless they've worked on
    building cars. I believe a major reason the US chip business remains
    so competitive is because almost all its CEOs have built chips.


  7. #7
    asadi
    Guest

    Default Re: Foreign cars pass Big 3

    Al gore talks a little on that subject in his movie Politics aside, it's a
    good movie.

    john

    "dbltap" <DoubleTap@37.com> wrote in message
    news:G0Bxg.3225$gF6.1123@newsread2.news.pas.earthl ink.net...
    > http://www.detnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll...plate=printart
    >
    > Foreign cars pass Big 3
    >
    > For the 1st time, U.S. drivers buy more import brands
    >
    > Josee Valcourt / The Detroit News
    >
    > For the first time, U.S. consumers are buying more cars and trucks built
    > by foreign automakers than vehicles made by Detroit's traditional Big
    > Three.
    >
    > New statistics compiled by R.L. Polk and Co., which counts new car
    > registrations and excludes sales to rental car agencies and other fleet
    > customers, show foreign brands commanded 52.9 percent of the retail auto
    > market in the first five months of 2006, while domestic automakers fell to
    > 47.1 percent.
    >
    > Domestic brands led foreign makes 51 percent to 49 percent over the same
    > period last year.
    >
    > While the power shift has been long in the making, it's nonetheless a
    > disheartening sign that Detroit's auto industry is losing the battle for
    > the hearts and wallets of American car buyers.
    >
    > Domestic brands such as Chevrolet, Ford and Dodge still control more than
    > half the U.S. market when fleet sales are included, but more profitable
    > retail sales are considered the best indicator of which auto brands are
    > most popular with customers.
    >
    > "I'm not surprised," said Christian Wardlaw, senior analyst with
    > Autobytel.com, a car shopping Web site. "The proof is sitting there in
    > black and white on paper. People can't refute it anymore."
    >
    > About 2.55 million new domestic-brand cars and trucks were registered in
    > the first five months of this year versus 2.86 million foreign nameplates
    > in the same period, Polk reported. The foreign nameplates figure includes
    > some brands such as Ford-owned Land Rover and Jaguar that are controlled
    > by the Big Three.
    >
    > Chrysler Group spokesman Kevin McCormick said the Auburn Hills-based
    > company doesn't get caught up in the industry scorekeeping, saying the
    > automaker is "focusing on things we can control in our business. Our
    > strategy at a high level is to put out the best cars and trucks that we
    > can at prices that are attractive to consumers."
    >
    > But industry experts say the numbers illustrate that Asian automakers such
    > as Toyota Motor Corp., Honda Motor Co and Nissan Motor Co. are doing a
    > better job meeting the needs of U.S. car buyers.
    >
    > Domestic brands have been hurt by lower quality scores, and more recently,
    > a heavy reliance on large trucks and SUVs at a time of a high gas prices.
    >
    > "People have been swapping SUVs for fuel-efficient cars, and the
    > domestics' car lineup hasn't been as compelling as the Asians'," Wardlaw
    > said.
    >
    > Amenities factor in
    >
    > Import brands are leveraging strong profits to turn out cars packed with
    > safety features, creature comforts and the latest technology, said Phil
    > Reed, consumer advice editor of auto research site Edmunds.com.
    >
    > "With American cars, you say 'This is nice and this is nice but why
    > couldn't they have done this?' " he said.
    >
    > The Ford Escape Hybrid, for example, has an optional navigation system,
    > but the screen that displays maps and approaching roads is too small, Reed
    > said. In addition, a disc has to be inserted to operate the system, but
    > there is no additional slot to play music CDs meaning the driver has to
    > choose between listening to tunes and navigating streets.
    >
    > With the availability of the Internet, buyers have become savvy about how
    > to compare the optional versus standard features they can get for their
    > money and can more easily calculate a vehicle's resale value.
    >
    > Vehicles made by Toyota, Honda and other top foreign makes generally hold
    > their value better than American brand cars and trucks, which are often
    > heavily discounted.
    >
    > "Toyota has a 10- to 15-year outlook on where the industry is heading,"
    > said James Bryant, automotive industry editor for Hoover's Inc., an online
    > business resource site. "GM and Ford tend to play along with whatever
    > happens to be the flavor of the week.
    >
    > "Everybody knew that $3 gas was going to come eventually," he added. "We
    > just didn't want to admit it."
    >
    > And foreign automakers have done a better job capturing the emerging
    > crossover SUV segment with vehicles like the Nissan Murano and U.S.
    > automakers are racing to catch up with offerings like the upcoming Ford
    > Edge.
    >
    > Toyota registrations rise
    >
    > Toyota's U.S. brands posted a 12.5 percent increase in retail sales in the
    > first five months of the year. By contrast, GM's retail sales slipped 7.7
    > percent. Excluding fleet sales, Toyota brands now outsell Ford and
    > Chrysler nameplates in the United States, Polk reported.
    >
    > Wardlaw said competing carmakers aren't only leading in important segments
    > but getting new products to the market at a faster pace.
    >
    > The product life cycle for an Asian nameplate is about four to six years
    > compared to six to eight years for a new domestic car or truck.
    >
    > Wardlaw points out, for example, that the Ford Focus was merely refreshed
    > for the U.S. market while the Focus sold in Europe was completely
    > redesigned.
    >
    > "What Americans got was a rehashed version of the old Focus and as a
    > result, Ford isn't in a position to compete" against popular small
    > vehicles such as the Honda Civic in the U.S. market at a time when gas
    > prices are pushing consumers to cars.
    >
    > In a separate study conducted by Autobytel.com Monday, online purchase
    > requests for large trucks such the Ford F-150 pickup fell 34 percent, and
    > 43 percent for the Toyota Tundra and Chevrolet Silverado for the second
    > quarter. In comparison, more fuel-efficient cars like the Toyota Camry and
    > Yaris, and the Honda Civic posted gains.
    >
    > "The trick for the domestic automakers is going to be that they need to
    > spread development dollars across every development segment in which they
    > want to compete, and that includes cars and trucks," Wardlaw said.
    >
    > You can reach Josee Valcourt at (313) 222-2300 or jmvalcourt@detnews.com.
    >
    >




  8. #8
    Jeff
    Guest

    Default Re: Foreign cars pass Big 3


    "Bassplayer12" <perettij@nbnet.nb.ca> wrote in message
    news:yfIxg.17744$pu3.351347@ursa-nb00s0.nbnet.nb.ca...
    > snip
    >
    >> While the power shift has been long in the making, it's nonetheless a
    >> disheartening sign that Detroit's auto industry is losing the battle for
    >> the hearts and wallets of American car buyers.

    >
    > Does anybody know how much it costs Toyota and Honda to build a car
    > compared to
    > the Big 3?
    > What are the benefits and salaries paid to the employees?
    > If there's a difference, the day may come when the Big 3 are going to
    > demand concessions
    > from them to save the companies and their jobs.


    It's already here. The companies are demanding concessions involved health
    care. Soon they will involve pensions. The Big 2 and the American part of
    the Dialmer-Chrysler and many of their suppliers have pension obligations
    that have not yet been met. IN most of Europe, the government takes care of
    the pensions.

    > snip
    >
    >> Chrysler Group spokesman Kevin McCormick said the Auburn Hills-based
    >> company doesn't get caught up in the industry scorekeeping, saying the
    >> automaker is "focusing on things we can control in our business. Our
    >> strategy at a high level is to put out the best cars and trucks that we
    >> can at prices that are attractive to consumers."

    >
    > Sorry, Chrysler. Count me out as a customer. For good. I've had too many
    > problems with my
    > minivan's transmission, peeling paint, etc. I'll remember.


    I would still consider them later. Their quality is improving, thanks to Dr.
    Z and others from Germany. And from competition in the US.

    >> But industry experts say the numbers illustrate that Asian automakers
    >> such as Toyota Motor Corp., Honda Motor Co and Nissan Motor Co. are doing
    >> a better job meeting the needs of U.S. car buyers.
    >>
    >> Domestic brands have been hurt by lower quality scores, and more
    >> recently, a heavy reliance on large trucks and SUVs at a time of a high
    >> gas prices.

    >
    > 2 years ago, my 93 Camry with 234,000 kms at the time, felt more solid and
    > gave a better ride
    > than a brand new rental Alero.


    My Contour is the same way. It only has 131,000 mi, which is about 220,000
    km.

    >> "People have been swapping SUVs for fuel-efficient cars, and the
    >> domestics' car lineup hasn't been as compelling as the Asians'," Wardlaw
    >> said.

    >
    > Aren't Impalas fuel efficient cars? Here in Canada, they are rated at
    > around 40MPG.
    > BTW, if you think it's too optimistic, remember that Canadian and US
    > gallons are different.


    The domestics were expecting SUVs and low gas prices to rule. Oops.

    That is why they needed more diversity.

    > snip
    >
    >> "Everybody knew that $3 gas was going to come eventually," he added. "We
    >> just didn't want to admit it."

    >
    > In Europe and Asia, they have been building ecenomical cars for the
    > longest time. In North
    > America, oil was cheap and we didn't care much.


    Oil wasn't really cheap. How much are we paying for the Iraq war?

    > snip
    >
    >> "The trick for the domestic automakers is going to be that they need to
    >> spread development dollars across every development segment in which they
    >> want to compete, and that includes cars and trucks," Wardlaw said.

    >
    > The trick is also to hire less people with accounting and business degrees
    > and more "car people".


    Incorrect. You also need accountants and other business types. Both car
    types and bean counters are important.

    Jeff



  9. #9
    Mike Hunter
    Guest

    Default Re: Foreign cars pass Big 3. but not on a steep grade

    I guess one can assume, in the opinion of Josee Valcourt the Corporate and
    government fleets and rental car companies, who individually are the largest
    SINGLE purchasers of ones vehicles are NOT making vehicles that are popular
    with THOSE customers? If those buyers are not customer why are the
    import brands try trying so hard to sell to them?

    Why are light truck buyers, who comprise nearly half of new vehicle
    purchases in the US, not customers? When one considers that there are
    nearly twenty import manufactures who are selling cars in the US, why are
    they NOT doing a far better job our outselling only three domestic
    manufactures? The domestics are indeed behind in total car sales, but
    import brands offer far more of the midget cars than domestics, and as a
    class are the least popular with buyers. When it comes to the more popular
    mid-size cars, although the Camry is the number one seller, domestics sell
    more mid-size cars although under several different brand names.


    mike hunt.


    "dbltap" <DoubleTap@37.com> wrote in message
    news:G0Bxg.3225$gF6.1123@newsread2.news.pas.earthl ink.net...
    > http://www.detnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll...plate=printart
    >
    > Foreign cars pass Big 3
    >
    > For the 1st time, U.S. drivers buy more import brands
    >
    > Josee Valcourt / The Detroit News
    >
    > For the first time, U.S. consumers are buying more cars and trucks built
    > by foreign automakers than vehicles made by Detroit's traditional Big
    > Three.
    >
    > New statistics compiled by R.L. Polk and Co., which counts new CAR
    > registrations and excludes sales to rental car agencies and other fleet
    > customers, show foreign brands commanded 52.9 percent of the retail auto
    > market in the first five months of 2006, while domestic automakers fell to
    > 47.1 percent.
    >
    > Domestic brands led foreign makes 51 percent to 49 percent over the same
    > period last year.
    >
    > Domestic brands such as Chevrolet, Ford and Dodge still control more than
    > half the U.S. market when fleet sales are included, but more profitable
    > retail sales are considered the best indicator of which auto brands are
    > most popular with customers.
    >

    ..
    >
    > You can reach Josee Valcourt at (313) 222-2300 or jmvalcourt@detnews.com.
    >
    >




  10. #10
    Bassplayer12
    Guest

    Default Re: Foreign cars pass Big 3

    snip

    >> The trick is also to hire less people with accounting and business
    >> degrees and more "car people".

    >
    > Incorrect. You also need accountants and other business types. Both car
    > types and bean counters are important.


    I totally agree with you. Read again my sentence. I suggested having more
    "car people" and "less" of the other kinds.



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