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Discuss Repairing Rusty Electrical Connectors in the alt.autos.gm forum at Car Dealer Forums; Some of the electrical connectors on my '63 Corvair have heavy rust. They are plated ...
  1. #1
    Scott Buchanan
    Guest

    Default Repairing Rusty Electrical Connectors

    Some of the electrical connectors on my '63 Corvair have heavy rust. They
    are plated steel. I can use rust remover to clean them up but the bare metal
    will rust eventually. I am looking for ways to tin, plate or seal the metal.
    The only idea that I have is to use silicone grease.

    Any suggestions?

    Thanks,
    Scott





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  2. #2
    Pop`
    Guest

    Default Re: Repairing Rusty Electrical Connectors

    Homer wrote:
    > Scott Buchanan a écrit :
    >
    >> Some of the electrical connectors on my '63 Corvair have heavy rust.
    >> They are plated steel. I can use rust remover to clean them up but
    >> the bare metal will rust eventually. I am looking for ways to tin,
    >> plate or seal the metal. The only idea that I have is to use
    >> silicone grease.
    >>
    >> Any suggestions?
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >> Scott

    >
    > Good idea, just fill the connector with Nylogel or any other
    > dialectric grease


    Idiot: Do you know what dielectric means?



  3. #3
    Pop`
    Guest

    Default Re: Repairing Rusty Electrical Connectors

    Scott Buchanan wrote:
    > Some of the electrical connectors on my '63 Corvair have heavy rust.
    > They are plated steel. I can use rust remover to clean them up but
    > the bare metal will rust eventually. I am looking for ways to tin,
    > plate or seal the metal. The only idea that I have is to use silicone
    > grease.
    >
    > Any suggestions?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Scott


    No, don't coat them or tin them or anythign else. Clean and replace as
    necessary. A light coating of grease will sometimes help AFTER the
    connections are tight, but once they're rusted the protective coating is
    gone and cannot be replaced. They're cheap - much better to replace them.

    Pop



  4. #4
    Weird
    Guest

    Default Re: Repairing Rusty Electrical Connectors

    No, why don't you explain, asshole!

    Pop` wrote:
    > Homer wrote:
    > > Scott Buchanan a écrit :
    > >
    > >> Some of the electrical connectors on my '63 Corvair have heavy rust.
    > >> They are plated steel. I can use rust remover to clean them up but
    > >> the bare metal will rust eventually. I am looking for ways to tin,
    > >> plate or seal the metal. The only idea that I have is to use
    > >> silicone grease.
    > >>
    > >> Any suggestions?
    > >>
    > >> Thanks,
    > >> Scott

    > >
    > > Good idea, just fill the connector with Nylogel or any other
    > > dialectric grease

    >
    > Idiot: Do you know what dielectric means?



  5. #5
    Scott Dorsey
    Guest

    Default Re: Repairing Rusty Electrical Connectors

    Scott Buchanan wrote:
    > Some of the electrical connectors on my '63 Corvair have heavy rust.
    > They are plated steel. I can use rust remover to clean them up but
    > the bare metal will rust eventually. I am looking for ways to tin,
    > plate or seal the metal. The only idea that I have is to use silicone
    > grease.
    >
    > Any suggestions?


    Replace them. Apply dielectric grease to the new ones so that this doesn't
    happen again.

    Once they are rusted, there is no way to get a nice clean tinned surface
    again.
    --scott

    --
    "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

  6. #6
    Keep YerSpam
    Guest

    Default Re: Repairing Rusty Electrical Connectors

    Scott Dorsey wrote:
    > Scott Buchanan wrote:
    >
    >>Some of the electrical connectors on my '63 Corvair have heavy rust.
    >>They are plated steel. I can use rust remover to clean them up but
    >>the bare metal will rust eventually. I am looking for ways to tin,
    >>plate or seal the metal. The only idea that I have is to use silicone
    >>grease.
    >>
    >>Any suggestions?

    >
    >
    > Replace them. Apply dielectric grease to the new ones so that this doesn't
    > happen again.
    >
    > Once they are rusted, there is no way to get a nice clean tinned surface
    > again.
    > --scott
    >


    So you're saying they can't be electroplated?
    Isn't that how they were made in the first place?
    I know I've seen DIY instructions & kits for electroplating all over the
    web. A simple google search for DIY electroplating should get thousands
    of results. I'm wondering if there's some reason they can't be used for
    electrical connectors.

    Of course new ones aren't real expensive. Fixing more hassle that the
    new ones are worth maybe?

    Cheers,
    - JJG

  7. #7
    Scott Dorsey
    Guest

    Default Re: Repairing Rusty Electrical Connectors

    Keep YerSpam <keepyerSPAM@yourown.com> wrote:
    >
    >So you're saying they can't be electroplated?
    >Isn't that how they were made in the first place?


    The problem is that the original metal underneath is now pitted. If you
    remove the rust from the surface, you now have connectors that have an
    uneven and pitted surface. If you plate over the pitted surface, you
    get an uneven and pitted plating.

    >I know I've seen DIY instructions & kits for electroplating all over the
    >web. A simple google search for DIY electroplating should get thousands
    >of results. I'm wondering if there's some reason they can't be used for
    >electrical connectors.


    Most of those connectors were probably hot-dipped in tin rather than
    electroplated. You could electroplate them, but it might be easier just
    to dip them in a solder pot. Regulate the pot temperature to adjust the
    thickness of the coating. The nickel-plating pens would work, though, IF
    you could get the original surface smooth and if IF the original metal has
    not become brittle.

    >Of course new ones aren't real expensive. Fixing more hassle that the
    >new ones are worth maybe?


    It's more than just hassle, it's the fact that you'll find most of those
    connectors are pitted and even if you're willing to spend a couple hours
    on each connector with a Dremel tool smoothing down the finish, you're
    going to wind up with thin and breakable metal.

    Note that a lot of those contacts are spring steel, and after a few years
    they are no longer springy. It is possible to re-anneal them on the bench
    with a jeweler's torch and a small furnace made from firebrick. It will
    cost you a lot time and a lot of money in gas, though.

    I think it's a bad idea, though, to put five or six hours work into a
    connector that sells for a dollar or two, especially when the end result
    will be a connector that is less reliable than the replacement.
    --scott
    --
    "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

  8. #8
    Mike Romain
    Guest

    Default Re: Repairing Rusty Electrical Connectors

    When I redid my Jeep, I replaced all the rotted ones. I found the wires
    were even rotted at the connection buried in the rubber so there really
    isn't much there to fix.

    I got lucky and a friend gave me a used harness out of a full sized GM
    van for a hand I gave him so I just cut out all the bad ones and used
    solder and heat shrink with dielectric grease inside the heat shrink to
    replace them. I also used dielectric grease inside each. My Jeep uses
    GM connections.

    I figured that was the best way to go short of rewiring. I did change
    wires that were discolored while I was in there.

    Mike
    86/00 CJ7 Laredo, 33x9.5 BFG Muds, 'glass nose to tail in '00
    88 Cherokee 235 BFG AT's
    Canadian Off Road Trips Photos: Non members can still view!
    Jan/06 http://www.imagestation.com/album/pi...?id=2115147590
    (More Off Road album links at bottom of the view page)

    Scott Buchanan wrote:
    >
    > Some of the electrical connectors on my '63 Corvair have heavy rust. They
    > are plated steel. I can use rust remover to clean them up but the bare metal
    > will rust eventually. I am looking for ways to tin, plate or seal the metal.
    > The only idea that I have is to use silicone grease.
    >
    > Any suggestions?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Scott


  9. #9
    Rodan
    Guest

    Default Re: Repairing Rusty Electrical Connectors

    Scott Buchanan wrote: ( '63 Corvair )

    Some of the electrical connectors have heavy rust.
    They are plated steel. I can use rust remover but
    the bare metal will rust eventually. I am looking for
    ways to tin, plate or seal the metal. The only idea
    that I have is to use silicone grease. Any suggestions?
    __________________________________________

    Homer wrote:

    Fill the connector with Nylogel or other dielectric grease.
    __________________________________________

    "Pop`" wrote:

    Idiot: Do you know what dielectric means?
    __________________________________________

    Dielectric means electrically non-conductive.

    Homer is correct - if an electrical connector is to be
    filled with grease to prevent further corrosion, the
    grease must be dielectric.

    Rodan.




  10. #10
    do_not_spam_me@my-deja.com
    Guest

    Default Re: Repairing Rusty Electrical Connectors


    Scott Buchanan wrote:

    > Some of the electrical connectors on my '63 Corvair have heavy rust. They
    > are plated steel. I can use rust remover to clean them up but the bare metal
    > will rust eventually. I am looking for ways to tin, plate or seal the metal.
    > The only idea that I have is to use silicone grease.


    There are tin plating solutions that may help, provided you can first
    remove every bit of the corrosion. They're sold by electronics
    supplies and are used for tin plating copper circuit boards.

    Are the connectors made of steel, or are they tin-plated brass? Bare
    brass will work.

    Apply silicone grease to the connectors before plugging them in so the
    grease seals better. This will not interfere with the electrical
    conduction since the metal will pierce the film of grease.


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