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Discuss 1998 Camry automatic transmission troubles in the alt.autos.toyota forum at Car Dealer Forums; My 1998 200K Camry automatic transmission seems to be shifting hard on both acceleration and ...
  1. #1
    RD
    Guest

    Default 1998 Camry automatic transmission troubles

    My 1998 200K Camry automatic transmission seems to be shifting hard on both
    acceleration and deceleration. Actually one of the reasons I prefer a Toyota
    to a Honda was because the transmission shifts were so smooth one hardly
    knew they were happening. Is this a problem and/or a simple fix?
    Also what is the correct way of checking tranny levels? I no longer have the
    manual.


    RD






    › See More: 1998 Camry automatic transmission troubles

  2. #2
    badgolferman
    Guest

    Default Re: 1998 Camry automatic transmission troubles

    RD, 8/30/2006, 11:06:36 AM, <ed49hs$v18$1@tribune.usask.ca> wrote:

    > My 1998 200K Camry automatic transmission seems to be shifting hard
    > on both acceleration and deceleration. Actually one of the reasons I
    > prefer a Toyota to a Honda was because the transmission shifts were
    > so smooth one hardly knew they were happening. Is this a problem
    > and/or a simple fix? Also what is the correct way of checking tranny
    > levels? I no longer have the manual.
    >
    >
    > RD


    The correct way to check it is to drive it around for a few miles,
    park, leave engine running, pull out dipstick, clean and reinsert,
    check dipstick again. If the fluid you cleaned is black or has metal
    shavings you need to get that fluid changed. Toyota recommends drain
    and refill every 30K miles (I think). Some will say drop the pan and
    clean the screen. Some will say do a flush instead. I say do what the
    manual says.

  3. #3
    Ray O
    Guest

    Default Re: 1998 Camry automatic transmission troubles


    "RD" <dosvader2061@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:ed49hs$v18$1@tribune.usask.ca...
    > My 1998 200K Camry automatic transmission seems to be shifting hard on
    > both
    > acceleration and deceleration. Actually one of the reasons I prefer a
    > Toyota
    > to a Honda was because the transmission shifts were so smooth one hardly
    > knew they were happening. Is this a problem and/or a simple fix?
    > Also what is the correct way of checking tranny levels? I no longer have
    > the manual.
    >
    >
    > RD
    >


    With the vehicle parked on level ground, engine running, transmission in
    park, parking brake set, pull the transmission dip stick, wipe it clean with
    a rag or paper towel, re-insert the dipstick all the way until the catch
    engages the dip stick, and pull it out. If the transmission has been
    running for less than a few minutes, the automatic transmission fluid (ATF)
    should be up to the "cold" mark, and if the transmission is warmed up, it
    should be up to the "hot" mark. The fluid should be red and translucent.
    If it is brown or black or has a burnt smell, the transmission fluid should
    be changed. If it has been more than 60,000 miles (95,000 Km) since the ATF
    has been changed, I would get it changed.

    Check the condition of the engine and transmission mounts.

    If the ATF and the engine and transmission mounts are all in good condition,
    the accumulators may be worn or leaking. The accumulators reduce shift
    shock.

    Some shift shock is not harmful to the transmission.
    --

    Ray O
    (correct punctuation to reply)



  4. #4
    Saskatoon1@gmail.com
    Guest

    Default Re: 1998 Camry automatic transmission troubles


    Ray O wrote:
    > "RD" <dosvader2061@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:ed49hs$v18$1@tribune.usask.ca...
    > > My 1998 200K Camry automatic transmission seems to be shifting hard on
    > > both
    > > acceleration and deceleration. Actually one of the reasons I prefer a
    > > Toyota
    > > to a Honda was because the transmission shifts were so smooth one hardly
    > > knew they were happening. Is this a problem and/or a simple fix?
    > > Also what is the correct way of checking tranny levels? I no longer have
    > > the manual.
    > >
    > >
    > > RD
    > >

    >
    > With the vehicle parked on level ground, engine running, transmission in
    > park, parking brake set, pull the transmission dip stick, wipe it clean with
    > a rag or paper towel, re-insert the dipstick all the way until the catch
    > engages the dip stick, and pull it out. If the transmission has been
    > running for less than a few minutes, the automatic transmission fluid (ATF)
    > should be up to the "cold" mark, and if the transmission is warmed up, it
    > should be up to the "hot" mark. The fluid should be red and translucent.
    > If it is brown or black or has a burnt smell, the transmission fluid should
    > be changed. If it has been more than 60,000 miles (95,000 Km) since the ATF
    > has been changed, I would get it changed.
    >
    > Check the condition of the engine and transmission mounts.
    >
    > If the ATF and the engine and transmission mounts are all in good condition,
    > the accumulators may be worn or leaking. The accumulators reduce shift
    > shock.
    >
    > Some shift shock is not harmful to the transmission.
    > --
    >
    > Ray O
    > (correct punctuation to reply)


    OK thanks. Are acculumulators something that only a transmission
    specialist can change or any mechanic?


  5. #5
    Ray O
    Guest

    Default Re: 1998 Camry automatic transmission troubles


    <Saskatoon1@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:1157063075.877922.207040@i3g2000cwc.googlegro ups.com...
    >
    > Ray O wrote:
    >> "RD" <dosvader2061@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    >> news:ed49hs$v18$1@tribune.usask.ca...
    >> > My 1998 200K Camry automatic transmission seems to be shifting hard on
    >> > both
    >> > acceleration and deceleration. Actually one of the reasons I prefer a
    >> > Toyota
    >> > to a Honda was because the transmission shifts were so smooth one
    >> > hardly
    >> > knew they were happening. Is this a problem and/or a simple fix?
    >> > Also what is the correct way of checking tranny levels? I no longer
    >> > have
    >> > the manual.
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > RD
    >> >

    >>
    >> With the vehicle parked on level ground, engine running, transmission in
    >> park, parking brake set, pull the transmission dip stick, wipe it clean
    >> with
    >> a rag or paper towel, re-insert the dipstick all the way until the catch
    >> engages the dip stick, and pull it out. If the transmission has been
    >> running for less than a few minutes, the automatic transmission fluid
    >> (ATF)
    >> should be up to the "cold" mark, and if the transmission is warmed up, it
    >> should be up to the "hot" mark. The fluid should be red and translucent.
    >> If it is brown or black or has a burnt smell, the transmission fluid
    >> should
    >> be changed. If it has been more than 60,000 miles (95,000 Km) since the
    >> ATF
    >> has been changed, I would get it changed.
    >>
    >> Check the condition of the engine and transmission mounts.
    >>
    >> If the ATF and the engine and transmission mounts are all in good
    >> condition,
    >> the accumulators may be worn or leaking. The accumulators reduce shift
    >> shock.
    >>
    >> Some shift shock is not harmful to the transmission.
    >> --
    >>
    >> Ray O
    >> (correct punctuation to reply)

    >
    > OK thanks. Are acculumulators something that only a transmission
    > specialist can change or any mechanic?
    >


    I've seen "mechanics" that cannot do a proper oil change, so I would not go
    so far as to say that **any** mechanic can change an accumulator. Basically
    involves draining the ATF, removing the transmission oil pan, swapping the
    accumulators, re-installing the pan and gasket, re-fill the ATF.
    --

    Ray O
    (correct punctuation to reply)



  6. #6
    Bruce L. Bergman
    Guest

    Default Re: 1998 Camry automatic transmission troubles

    On 31 Aug 2006 15:24:35 -0700, Saskatoon1@gmail.com wrote:
    >Ray O wrote:
    >> "RD" <dosvader2061@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    >> news:ed49hs$v18$1@tribune.usask.ca...


    >> > My 1998 200K Camry automatic transmission seems to be shifting hard on
    >> > both acceleration and deceleration.

    >>
    >> With the vehicle parked on level ground, engine running, transmission in
    >> park, parking brake set, pull the transmission dip stick, wipe it clean with
    >> a rag or paper towel, re-insert the dipstick all the way until the catch
    >> engages the dip stick, and pull it out. If the transmission has been
    >> running for less than a few minutes, the automatic transmission fluid (ATF)
    >> should be up to the "cold" mark, and if the transmission is warmed up, it
    >> should be up to the "hot" mark. The fluid should be red and translucent.
    >> If it is brown or black or has a burnt smell, the transmission fluid should
    >> be changed. If it has been more than 60,000 miles (95,000 Km) since the ATF
    >> has been changed, I would get it changed.
    >>
    >> Check the condition of the engine and transmission mounts.
    >>
    >> If the ATF and the engine and transmission mounts are all in good condition,
    >> the accumulators may be worn or leaking. The accumulators reduce shift
    >> shock.
    >>
    >> Some shift shock is not harmful to the transmission.

    >
    >OK thanks. Are acculumulators something that only a transmission
    >specialist can change or any mechanic?


    They are little chambers in the main valve body inside the
    transmission that time-delay the full engagement of the next gear for
    a few tenths of a second. They most likely have to drop the pan for
    access.

    A regular mechanic might be able to do the work - eventually. Much
    transmission work is farmed out - most independent repair shops don't
    really 'do' trannys, even some smaller dealer shops don't have the
    time to mess with them. For warranty repairs they often just swap out
    the entire trans with a new or remanufactured one, and send the 'bad'
    one back for dissection.

    A transmission specialist shop can figure it out and fix it much
    faster, because they do it all day, every day. To people who know the
    insides of the box intimately they'll probably be able to diagnose it
    from a quick test run around the block, and it's a quick & simple
    repair: Drop the pan, change the part, button it up, top off the
    fluid, Done.

    --<< Bruce >>--


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