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Discuss P0300 Code on my 2001 Corolla in the alt.autos.toyota forum at Car Dealer Forums; Hi, I checked to see whether there is any code stored before I send my ...
  1. #1
    wenmang@yahoo.com
    Guest

    Default P0300 Code on my 2001 Corolla

    Hi,

    I checked to see whether there is any code stored before I send my car
    for PA state inspection. To my surprise, I got P0300, but check engine
    light is not on yet. What should I do? replace plugs? My car has 91K
    on it. Thx.




    › See More: P0300 Code on my 2001 Corolla

  2. #2
    C. E. White
    Guest

    Default Re: P0300 Code on my 2001 Corolla


    <wenmang@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:1194371521.487741.223700@22g2000hsm.googlegro ups.com...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I checked to see whether there is any code stored before I send my car
    > for PA state inspection. To my surprise, I got P0300, but check engine
    > light is not on yet. What should I do? replace plugs? My car has 91K
    > on it. Thx.


    See
    http://www.obd-codes.com/trouble_cod...e-detected.php.

    When was the last time you had the plugs replaced? How about the plug wires?
    If it was my car and the plugs have not been changed recently, I'd replace
    the plugs and plug wires and add a can of Chevron Techron CleanUp to the
    fuel tank and drive the car for a week or so and recehck the codes.

    Ed



  3. #3
    Jeff Strickland
    Guest

    Default Re: P0300 Code on my 2001 Corolla

    This code could have been stored months ago, or yesterday. There is no way
    to tell.

    Reset the codes and go to your inspection. If you have time -- the mandatory
    inspection is weeks away, but you just want to get it done -- then reset the
    codes and check them again in a week or so to see if the code is back. Time,
    days or weeks, really is not the issue here. Time, hours of operation, is
    the actual issue.






    <wenmang@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:1194371521.487741.223700@22g2000hsm.googlegro ups.com...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I checked to see whether there is any code stored before I send my car
    > for PA state inspection. To my surprise, I got P0300, but check engine
    > light is not on yet. What should I do? replace plugs? My car has 91K
    > on it. Thx.
    >



  4. #4
    mrsteveo
    Guest

    Default Re: P0300 Code on my 2001 Corolla

    On Nov 6, 12:25 pm, "Jeff Strickland" <cr...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > This code could have been stored months ago, or yesterday. There is no way
    > to tell.
    >


    I have a question.

    I'm a computer junky but I don't know much about the OBD computers in
    cars.

    That being said, you mentioned the code could have been stored months
    ago or even yesterday which is a good point but that brings me to my
    question.

    Does the OBD computer not track date and time?

    I would think a date and time would be quite handy. Reason being...
    sometimes you get codes thrown under unusual circumstances. Of
    course, resetting the car computer erases the code and one could
    assume if it doesn't come back -- all is good. In the OP's case, had
    the computer stored a date and time, it would be possible to match up
    the 'freeze frame' data with a time and date and then possibly the OP
    could say 'Oh yeah, I was driving up a steep hill with 4 passengers
    and a loaded trunk..' which would/could possibly help diagnose things.

    Anyway, not a big deal but I would think the OBD computer keeping date
    and time would be a big help if it's not currently like that.


  5. #5
    Jeff Strickland
    Guest

    Default Re: P0300 Code on my 2001 Corolla


    "mrsteveo" <mrsteveo@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:1194386968.654929.177750@e9g2000prf.googlegro ups.com...
    > On Nov 6, 12:25 pm, "Jeff Strickland" <cr...@verizon.net> wrote:
    >> This code could have been stored months ago, or yesterday. There is no
    >> way
    >> to tell.
    >>

    >
    > I have a question.
    >
    > I'm a computer junky but I don't know much about the OBD computers in
    > cars.
    >
    > That being said, you mentioned the code could have been stored months
    > ago or even yesterday which is a good point but that brings me to my
    > question.
    >
    > Does the OBD computer not track date and time?
    >


    No, the OBD system does not display date and time. I don't know that it
    knows the date and time, this would require an output from the clock that is
    not required to exist under the ODB II spec. I wear a Casio atomic watch
    that synchs to Denver everyday, I suppose they could build a similar thing
    into the car so the OBD II system could time stamp the error codes, but then
    they would be obliged to display the time on the clock so the operator would
    not have to set the clock twice a year and when the battery goes flat.
    Having said that, I agree that it might be handy.



    > I would think a date and time would be quite handy. Reason being...
    > sometimes you get codes thrown under unusual circumstances. Of
    > course, resetting the car computer erases the code and one could
    > assume if it doesn't come back -- all is good. In the OP's case, had
    > the computer stored a date and time, it would be possible to match up
    > the 'freeze frame' data with a time and date and then possibly the OP
    > could say 'Oh yeah, I was driving up a steep hill with 4 passengers
    > and a loaded trunk..' which would/could possibly help diagnose things.
    >
    > Anyway, not a big deal but I would think the OBD computer keeping date
    > and time would be a big help if it's not currently like that.
    >


    I follow your reasoning, and agree with the premise, but there is nothing in
    the spec and I doubt that it is implemented.

    And, yes IF the code was stored as an anomoly -- the code was stored but the
    Check light did not come on -- then one could safely reset it and if it did
    not repeat then it was definitely an anomoly. If it was a real problem, the
    Check light should have come on, and it should come back on if no other
    service is performed when the computer is reset.






  6. #6
    Ray O
    Guest

    Default Re: P0300 Code on my 2001 Corolla


    "mrsteveo" <mrsteveo@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:1194386968.654929.177750@e9g2000prf.googlegro ups.com...
    > On Nov 6, 12:25 pm, "Jeff Strickland" <cr...@verizon.net> wrote:
    >> This code could have been stored months ago, or yesterday. There is no
    >> way
    >> to tell.
    >>

    >
    > I have a question.
    >
    > I'm a computer junky but I don't know much about the OBD computers in
    > cars.
    >
    > That being said, you mentioned the code could have been stored months
    > ago or even yesterday which is a good point but that brings me to my
    > question.
    >
    > Does the OBD computer not track date and time?
    >
    > I would think a date and time would be quite handy. Reason being...
    > sometimes you get codes thrown under unusual circumstances. Of
    > course, resetting the car computer erases the code and one could
    > assume if it doesn't come back -- all is good. In the OP's case, had
    > the computer stored a date and time, it would be possible to match up
    > the 'freeze frame' data with a time and date and then possibly the OP
    > could say 'Oh yeah, I was driving up a steep hill with 4 passengers
    > and a loaded trunk..' which would/could possibly help diagnose things.
    >
    > Anyway, not a big deal but I would think the OBD computer keeping date
    > and time would be a big help if it's not currently like that.
    >


    A time/date stamp could be very useful, but OBD II systems don't have one.
    Perhaps OBD II will have it?
    --

    Ray O
    (correct punctuation to reply)



  7. #7
    mrsteveo
    Guest

    Default Re: P0300 Code on my 2001 Corolla

    On Nov 6, 2:42 pm, "Jeff Strickland" <cr...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > "mrsteveo" <mrste...@gmail.com> wrote in message
    >
    > news:1194386968.654929.177750@e9g2000prf.googlegro ups.com...
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Nov 6, 12:25 pm, "Jeff Strickland" <cr...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > >> This code could have been stored months ago, or yesterday. There is no
    > >> way
    > >> to tell.

    >
    > > I have a question.

    >
    > > I'm a computer junky but I don't know much about the OBD computers in
    > > cars.

    >
    > > That being said, you mentioned the code could have been stored months
    > > ago or even yesterday which is a good point but that brings me to my
    > > question.

    >
    > > Does the OBD computer not track date and time?

    >
    > No, the OBD system does not display date and time. I don't know that it
    > knows the date and time, this would require an output from the clock that is
    > not required to exist under the ODB II spec. I wear a Casio atomic watch
    > that synchs to Denver everyday, I suppose they could build a similar thing
    > into the car so the OBD II system could time stamp the error codes, but then
    > they would be obliged to display the time on the clock so the operator would
    > not have to set the clock twice a year and when the battery goes flat.
    > Having said that, I agree that it might be handy.
    >
    > > I would think a date and time would be quite handy. Reason being...
    > > sometimes you get codes thrown under unusual circumstances. Of
    > > course, resetting the car computer erases the code and one could
    > > assume if it doesn't come back -- all is good. In the OP's case, had
    > > the computer stored a date and time, it would be possible to match up
    > > the 'freeze frame' data with a time and date and then possibly the OP
    > > could say 'Oh yeah, I was driving up a steep hill with 4 passengers
    > > and a loaded trunk..' which would/could possibly help diagnose things.

    >
    > > Anyway, not a big deal but I would think the OBD computer keeping date
    > > and time would be a big help if it's not currently like that.

    >
    > I follow your reasoning, and agree with the premise, but there is nothing in
    > the spec and I doubt that it is implemented.
    >
    > And, yes IF the code was stored as an anomoly -- the code was stored but the
    > Check light did not come on -- then one could safely reset it and if it did
    > not repeat then it was definitely an anomoly. If it was a real problem, the
    > Check light should have come on, and it should come back on if no other
    > service is performed when the computer is reset.


    Fair enough. I did find this:

    http://www.davisnet.com/product_docu...chip_specs.pdf

    I probably wouldn't use it as I am weary of any after market crap
    although it is interesting looking to say the least.


  8. #8
    C. E. White
    Guest

    Default Re: P0300 Code on my 2001 Corolla


    "mrsteveo" <mrsteveo@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:1194396735.936238.260100@v29g2000prd.googlegr oups.com...

    > Fair enough. I did find this:
    >
    > http://www.davisnet.com/product_docu...chip_specs.pdf
    >
    > I probably wouldn't use it as I am weary of any after market crap
    > although it is interesting looking to say the least.



    I have one. It works fine, assuming you don't have one of the vehicles they
    list as exception vehicles. It will record failure codes, and a limited
    number of other parameters. I used in on the SO's old van when it was
    suffering from the random misfire problem. In the end, for her, the problem
    was a burned valve (probably related to towing a 24 foot sailboat up I-95 at
    70 mph). I have a number of OBD-II code readers. My advice is to get a cheap
    one. I have the older version of the Equus 3100 reader (see
    http://www.iequus.com/products.php?category_id=1_10_7 . Unfortunately it
    doesn't handle the newer CAN systems, so I need to upgrade - which is why I
    suggest sticking with the cheaper ones. They can only read generic codes,
    but that is good enough for a lot of problems. Testers to read manufacturer
    specific codes can run into big bucks.

    Ed



  9. #9
    Ray O
    Guest

    Default Re: P0300 Code on my 2001 Corolla


    <wenmang@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:1194444485.496258.238220@57g2000hsv.googlegro ups.com...
    > Somebody mentioned plug wire, is it Ignition coil? Should I replace
    > plugs along with Ignition coil?
    >
    >


    I doubt if the ignition coils are bad. As I mentioned before, if the car
    has over 90,000 miles, replace the spark plugs with OEM spark plugs.
    --

    Ray O
    (correct punctuation to reply)



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